Proto feathers on large tyrannosaurids?

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5 March 2019
3
2
3
16
Species
Nanuqsaurus
Gender
Female
#1
We know for a fact that early tyrannosaurs had proto feathers; Dilong, Yutyrannus and a few other asian tyrannosaurids have been found with feathers. Asian and North American tyrannosaurids split off, that is why we have T. rex and T. bataar, the two largest tyrannosaurids on both continents. Both belong to the large family of Tyrannosauridae, which houses Tyrannosaurinae. T. rex and T. bataar are know to be mostly, if completely scaly. We have evidence for most tyrannosaurids to be scaly with no proto feathers. Mark Witton, a paleoartist and paleontologist has made a few diagrams or charts so to speak of scale impressions on large tyrannosaurids. His work is fantastic in addition, he is very knowledgeable in the field. Why am I talking so much about cladstics? It is easier to trace a trait using cladstics than anything else. My fursona is a N. hoglundi ( Nanuqsaurus Hoglundi ) a tyrannosaurid belonging to tyrannosaurinae. N. hoglundi was a small tyrannosaurid that lived in the Prince Creek formation of Alaska. The climate was warmer than now and the mountains in that area were forming at that time. This specie is very fragmentary, only being known from a part of the lower jaw. I believe this specie could be feathered, but not completely. N. hoglundi is small but may have the chance of having some sort of proto feathers. What do you guys think? If anything I said is incorrect, please tell me!
 

Skytech

Active Member
4 October 2016
182
49
28
65
Species
Vulpan
Gender
Male
#2
Stop scaring me! I'm picturing flying T. Rexs now!

And don't mention this to the Japanese!
 

Naberius

Well-Known Member
3 October 2016
1,133
162
63
23
New Mexico
Species
Science Experiment
Gender
Male
#3
Well, theropods are funny. Most if not all had feathers. After all, birds are technically theropods. If you ate chicken, turkey, duck or goose, you've technically eaten a dinosaur.
 
5 March 2019
3
2
3
16
Species
Nanuqsaurus
Gender
Female
#4
Well, theropods are funny. Most if not all had feathers. After all, birds are technically theropods. If you ate chicken, turkey, duck or goose, you've technically eaten a dinosaur.

We have quite a few soft tissue impressions of large tyrannosaurs. And they show scales, not feathers. Dromeosaursoids are a different story though.